Myndaniðurstaða fyrir resources

 

 

Bullying; effects on brain

See the source imageHere is a compilation of recent research on the effects of bullying on brain structures. Such brain  research is rather new compared to research on complex trauma. Findings indicate similar effects of bullying as of trauma and neglect in childhood and adolescence.

 

 

Self-limiting inner talkWhat Would You Recommend for Self-Compassion and Self-Healing?

Short video  with a woman who shed her own self-critical chain, a good example of how the way we communicate internally can take us over. The self talk can be so chronic that we do not notice it, it has become “us”, an inner “truth””about who we are. At times it can classify as inner abuse and a way we would not allow other people to talk to us. How come we allow ourselves to break us down?  Therapy with me can replace self-criticism with self-compassion. Here is a short video  where Christopher Germer explores how self-compassion can reduce depression and anxiety.

 

Effects of childhood abuse on the brainMyndaniðurstaða fyrir neurology

Recent (2017) study supporting the theory of profound and demonstratable harmful effects of childhood abuse on the brain. How it is not something children forget, get over  but may lastingly disrupt brain functions.

 

 

Psychotherapy and psychopharmacologyDrug Companies Pushed 76 Billion Opioid Pills Across U.S. From ...

An interview with Frank Anderson psychiatrist and IFS psychotherapist where he explores common questions and misconceptions about the use of medicine to aid therapy.

 

Failure is an event, not a personSee the source image

A short video with Jay Shetty on limiting yourself by avoiding risks.

 

 

Don’t give upDucklings Accomplish Grueling Task Of Climbing Stairs

These cutest ever ducklings all got there in the end. One was very fast, one came in very much the last one and most of them got there on a similar time. That is how we humans are. We were born into different circumstances and we have had different experiences in life. Some of us got really solid foundations in childhood that help us deal with adversities in life. Others did not and that might result in more life distress where more efforts and time is needed to heal our pain.  Don’t give up in your strive for healing your pain and having a fulfilling life. Psychotherapy with me respects your inner world as it is and helps you heal in a safe effective manner.

 

Gabor Maté on childhood trauma

Myndaniðurstaða fyrir gabor mateOne of Maté´s good articles. He is a leading thinker on the nature and causes of addictions, anxiety, ADHD and stress. In my work I am guided by such an approach.

 

 

The therapeutic relationship and healingMyndaniðurstaða fyrir connection

Attachment difficulties can seriously impair our quality of life. They create difficulties in relating and communicating with others in a nourishing deep way and in maintaining our relationships. Underlying is often anxiety, fear of other people and how they see us because we see ourselves in a negative shameful way. The origin of attachment difficulties is often in childhood and life re-enforces our believes. Here is a good article on how the therapeutic relationship can help to heal our relational difficulties – with others and ourselves.

 

A way to stop criticising yourself

Myndaniðurstaða fyrir inner critic

This short cartoon  explains how the inner critic works. Self-criticism can be so integrated in you that you do not even notice it, you think its normal, that this is “you .” But no! you do not need to accommodate it any longer. It is a voice that was created as a result of trauma or unfriendly behaviour of others towards you at some time in your life.  Self-criticism can lead to depression and anxiety, particularly social anxiety, leading to isolation and  inability to live to your fullest capabilities.  The book “Embracing your inner critic: turning self-criticism into a creative asset” by Hal Stone and Sidra Stone is a good short book to start with.  And this article, Inner Critic by Sharon Good. Therapy can transform self-criticism into self-compassion.